Call me Russ L

Pre-Supersonic blast-through

Posted in Modern Living, Music by Russ L on 17 October, 2012

Wednesday the 10th was a matter of Michelle Shocked at the Poelagus & Poochie. She is apparently doing a thing called “Roadworks” where she tours in roughly the same places at roughly the same times every year, which would explain why it was near-enough a year since I last saw her. I’m not sure about the name, though. She wouldn’t have made it there in the first place if there were that many roadworks.

Great fun, anyway, just as one might expect – simple songs (as Michelle herself noted) that create a lovely all-in-it-together type atmosphere even for such an anti-social sod as me, and provide an opening to convey many specific facts that you may or may not have known. I was aghast at her tales of “Dual Tracking” – in America, it seems, if you go to your bank for a mortgage adjustment they might well tell you that you have to miss two payments before they’re able to alter your repayment scheme. If you actually go ahead and do that to oblige them, they’ll repossess your house under the terms of the original mortgage. Expect such swindles to start happening over here when the “no more council houses, privately owned property is the only just and proper way” project is finally complete.

Anyway: we heard most of the ones we wanted to hear, between Chel’s own choices and the substantial requests section at the end. She actually played “Anchorage” twice due to the persistence of one fella requesting it it (see what asking nicely does for you? The bloke last year who kept on shouting for the already-played “5am In Amsterdam” but being a dickhead about it might well have learned from this), although the second time around the vocals were nearly entirely turned over to us lot in the audience (the first time, incidentally, revealed that “that love song” she played at her friend’s wedding was “The Water Is Wide”. Last year it was revealed to be “A New England”. Does it change at every gig?). Things closed with an intense acapella version of “The Ballad Of Penny Evans” from the floor, which was a powerful thing to encounter close up.

I quite often seem to have a bit of a block when it comes to going to see the 90s Britrock bands that were a big part of my teenage years. The Wildhearts cop it the worst – I’ve managed to miss every single Wildhearts and Wildhearts-related (this includes ex-member bands) gig since that, er, interesting one at J.B.’s way back in 2001, and there have been quite a lot. That was never the plan, but it seems to have worked out that way. Terrorvision have been neglected to a lesser degree, but that’s only a result of them having played fewer gigs round these parts over the last several years. I saw three of their gigs (also in 2001) the first time around, before they originally split up, but none from their numerous re-union tours since then. I did actually have a ticket for their do at The Academy on the first re-union tour, but managed to fall asleep early in the evening and miss the gig. Bless me.

Now, though, they’re back together more formally! With a new album and everything! And I went to see them! (Although I nearly didn’t. I very nearly went to see John Cale instead. Never mind that though).

That was all an unnecessarily long wind-up for the fact that it was, in essence, a Terrorvision gig. If you’ve never seen a Terrorvision gig, just imagine what you think a Terrorvision gig might be like. It’s exactly like that.

Which is, of course, great fun.

Saturday the 13th saw me heading over to The Crescent Theatre for Midland Opera‘s production of “Turandot”, but we’ll be coming back to that later. The long-threatened opera digest posts will be written. They won’t be worth reading, but they will be written.

To the Digger & Dog again on Monday the 15th, to see Michael Chapman for the fourth time in only slightly over a year. There were significantly fewer attendees than there were when he played five minutes down the road at The Station in January.

Katherine Priddy was on first, and I liked her even more than I did when I saw her a month ago. This time she played a greater proportion of her own songs (including two that she’d only written the previous week – “I don’t know what came over me”). She seemed a touch more Celtic this time around (although I couldn’t tell you precisely what gave me that impression), still channeling that pure-as-the-driven-snow quiet-hippy-folk thing but also displaying a touch of steel in the heart on a version of Seth Lakeman’s “1643”. Occasionally you come across an artiste who seems to have an indefinable special something about them, and I think Katherine Priddy is such a one.

I was a touch worried about the possibility of diminishing returns when it came to Micky C, given that I’ve seen him so much of late, but as it turned out this probably turned out to be my favourite set of the four of his that I’ve encountered. He actually did “Postcards Of Scarborough!”. Quite a few songs of the familiar songs that he always does were at a faster tempo than usual, giving us our highlight in a particularly powerful run through “Memphis In Winter”. He was on particularly good comedic form between songs, too (“After steam trains and chainsaws, one of my main hobbies is annoying Americans…”).

Right, I’ve got all of that out of the way now and it’s a good thing too because Supersonique starts very shortly. The timetable came out today! I think I was spoiled a bit last year by not having needed any taxis home: this one looks like it’ll have two nights beyond the wall of bus-sleep. And that comes dear. There don’t seem to be any obvious paths (if you see what I mean) from the start of the days to the end for me, either, but then again that’s probably a wonderful opportunity for even more than usual of that serendipiditdipihoppitihoppity they talk about.

It’s always ace, whichever way up. There are still tickets. I’d recommend that you get one.

Wary as I am of becoming unnecessarily programmatic (heh heh heh. You don’t encounter many people who are as predictable as me), rather than the usual linkstyles I will present you without a couple of blog posts and subsequent comment threads that have caught my mind in a nagging “I really, really wish this actually hadn’t caught my mind” type of way just recently:

~ Marc Reeves asks Why have Birmingham’s hyperlocal bloggers failed to deliver?, and the obvious answer pointed out by the usual sane figures is “because they never wanted to ‘deliver’ what you seem to be asking for in the first place”. Others suggest that people who blog as a hobby and say that there isn’t necessarily a commercial necessity for it must be displaying “lofty patrician contempt” for those that do try to do it commercially. For some piggin’ reason.

~ I don’t have the first idea what in the world is going on with the Jimmy Saville thing (that Paul Merton outed him years ago, ah reckon) but Stuart “author of the incredibly funny ‘Frantic Planet’ books that you definitely should read” Millard had a post taking the piss out of the David Icke forums’ predictable response to whatever what-all what-have-you has been going on, and to absolutely no-one’s surprise the inevitable has occurred in the comments.

That bleeding internet. It makes me glad that I’m not on it.

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2 Responses

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  1. The Baron said, on 18 October, 2012 at 11:44 am

    Stuck a seriously poorly shot vid of Shocked’s Ballad of…performance up on the blog. Looks like I filmed the ceiling, which may well be the case, but at least you can hear it!

  2. Russ L said, on 18 October, 2012 at 5:12 pm

    Go to that place, homies.


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